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The Aftermath Project – 2020 Conflict Photography Grant

The Aftermath Project has opened its 2020 grant cycle and invites all working conflict photographers around the world to participate with their projects.

The Aftermath Project is open to working photographers worldwide who are interested in creating work that helps illumine aftermath issues, and encourages greater public understanding and discussion of these issues.

For its 12th grant cycle, The Aftermath Project will award a $25,000 grant to one photographer and announce four finalists.

The Aftermath Project’s mission is to support photographic projects that tell the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace. Grant proposals should reflect an understanding of this mission. Proposals may relate to the aftermath of numerous kinds of conflict, not just international wars.

The conflict may have been at the community level — for example, violence between rural ethnic groups or an urban riot in an industrialized country. It may have been a regional one, such as a rebelinsurgency, or it may have been a full-scale war. There is no specific time frame thatdefines “aftermath,” although ingeneral The Aftermath Project seeks to support stories which are no longer being covered by the mainstream media, or whichhave been ignored by the media.

In general, conflict should be over for a situation to be deemed an “aftermath.” There arespecific cases, however, where conflict may have continued for so long, or be the result of an aftermath situation, that theywill be considered to be within the scope of The Aftermath Project. If you have doubts about whether your proposal meets these guidelines, please email aftermathprojectinfo@gmail.com. Proposals should include an explanation of the specific aftermath issues related to the project being proposed, as well as an overview of the applicant’s plans for covering the story during the course of the grant year — i.e, the proposed timing of trips, etc. You MUST inform The Aftermath Project if you have any commercial commitments or contracts related to the project you are proposing, including book deals and exhibitions. Failure to do so on the part of a grant winner will automatically terminate the grant, and the winner will forfeit any funds s/hehas not yet received from The Aftermath Project.

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization committed to telling the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace. The Project is an outcome of photographer and writer Sara Terry’s five-year-long project, Aftermath: Bosnia’s Long Road to Peace, about the aftermath of the 1992–95 war in Bosnia and Hercegovina.